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Overcoming Challenges in Teaching Speech Science Online - Shared screen with speaker view
Amy Meredith
41:43
I've also found break out rooms on Zoom work well for small group discussions.
Jenna Luque
49:55
Where is the hand raise, sorry?
Jenna Luque
50:20
Thanks!!!
Ferenc Bunta
50:34
How do you ensure that not all the assessments are open notes?
Tim Bressmann
51:06
My microphone does not work! I am some speech scientist …
Jenna Luque
51:23
I have been teaching Speech Science online for ~6 years now, and I use projects a lot to help with this.
Elaine Shuey
51:56
D2l has a browser lock down function, but it doesn't function on certain types of computers
Juliet Weinhold
53:41
Respondus lockdown browser can be very helpful, but students require specific types of computers for that to work. For example, Respondus won't work with Chromebook or some tablets.
Jenna Luque
54:04
There is also a lot of stress associated with those browsers. We get a lot of student reports about that.
Kerry Mandulak
54:09
We did zoom proctoring for comprehensive exams
Kelly Kleinhans
54:27
We were able to use similar system, honorlock, which used AI to look for atypical behaviors during testing. If the AI flagged a behavior a proctor would contact the student to determine if this violated instructions for test administration or not. Students did well and no complaints.
Jess Kisenwether
54:32
Yes thank you Juliet, that is true
Sarah Ferguson
57:08
Can anyone on the call show a working whiteboard now?
Jeremy Hathway
58:25
Zoom also allows you to share your iPad screen. You could then draw on the iPad and share that.
Margaret Blake
59:00
I use a surface pro and started using the whiteboard on it even during face-to-face classes when the classroom is set up so that the projector screen covers the white board. Easy to switch between ppt and whiteboard during class (or even to write on the slides)
Nancy Aarts
59:39
I consider the quizzes to be learning and assessment opportunities. So I have students take one quiz after every topic’s course content. They have three opportunities to take each quiz and each quiz is timed at 20 min maximum.
Nancy Aarts
01:00:14
I also use polleverywhere to ask questions of the students that they answer anonymously. Their responses show me what they are getting and what I need to revisit.
Alice
01:01:19
Jenna, what program did you say you use for the pop-up questions?
paul evitts
01:01:57
everybody ok with requiring students to download praat and wavesurfer?
Kathy Nagle
01:02:33
I feel much better about praat and wavesurfer than I do about some of the surveillance software, fwiw
Jenna Luque
01:02:46
I have my class use Praat for sure
Jess Kisenwether
01:02:54
I have used Alvin as well
JS
01:02:55
The program for pop-up questions embedded in videos is PlayPosit https://go.playposit.com/
Kelly Kleinhans
01:02:57
Last fall I created 2 minute practice sessions using screen-cast-o-matic. I would provide word lists recorded (just like class) then shared the answers in a pdf file.
Kerry Mandulak
01:03:00
I still have everyone use PRAAT but wave surfer has become troublesome especially for macs
Rosalie Perkins
01:03:08
I am requiring my students to download Praat and to have headphones. Students are asked to contact me if there is a conflict with the download. As a backup, we Zoom video record demonstrations of Praat.
Molly Schenker
01:03:19
I’m wondering about that, too, Paul. I have some students who use chrome books. In the past, I had those students buddy up with someone who has a Mac or PC, but not sure what to do now.
Carol Tessel
01:03:19
I am also teaching phonetics over the summer and I have been making whiteboard transcription videos of the exercises in the Small book and pasting the link to the video into the powerpoint for them to watch later. I have been doing this through an app called educreations on my ipad. I don't have a touchscreen laptop.
Ferenc Bunta
01:03:27
I found that WaveSurfer is a lot easier to teach than PRAAT … unless you are teaching an advanced course on acoustics
Carly Jo Hosbach-Cannon
01:04:18
I also require Praat, and occasionally use Raven lite in-class.
Amy Meredith
01:05:02
I love WASP! I learned about this at a webinar on telepractice for treating voice clients.
Molly Schenker
01:05:10
Thats fantastic. Thank you! I’ll take a look at WASP.
Richard Lewis
01:06:31
When mentioning some of the apps, could the speaker spell the particular app? Sound quality varies amomg the speakers.
Kelly Kleinhans
01:06:43
Pro with the white board Susan!
Amanda Warren
01:06:46
Bob Ross
Cathy Torrington Eaton
01:07:33
What (free) resources does anyone recommend to help with neuroanatomy? I assign coloring pages in the classroom, but would love other ideas.
Ferenc Bunta
01:07:40
The advantage of WaveSurfer (besides its simpler and relatively easier-to-teach structure) is that students can run it on the fly (basically, you can carry it with you).
Kelly Kleinhans
01:07:48
I would value input on how to create rubrics for alternative assessments. My experience is if an aspect of a project is not listed in the rubric students don't even consider the bigger picture, rather will use it as a check list.
Kathy Nagle
01:08:11
WASP: https://www.speechandhearing.net/laboratory/wasp/
Juliet Weinhold
01:08:15
I agree, Wavesurfer seems to be more user friendly for beginning students.
Kerry Mandulak
01:09:18
Is everyone able to have students download wave surfer without problems? Has there been updates? I loved it but had to stop using it because so many people couldn’t download it
paul evitts
01:09:37
too many trojans with wavesurfer--hence my hesitation.
Ferenc Bunta
01:10:19
WASP: https://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/resource/sfs/wasp.php
paul evitts
01:10:27
what about CPP-- anyone have a good way to have students acquire CPP data short of going through the praat script?
Ferenc Bunta
01:10:30
WaveSurfer: https://sourceforge.net/projects/wavesurfer/
Ashwini Joshi
01:10:30
I use Praat for undergrad and grad. I give them a .pdf walking them through the steps with screenshots as needed. The issues students have had, have primarily been with recording sound on a Mac. Using the built-in mic works better than an external mic for Mac
Jim
01:10:54
I use PRAAT but the expectations are very basic. Record, save, and display. Students also use it to measure formants, VOT, etc. It has advantages re. download, installation and support.
paul evitts
01:11:08
the old wavesurfer is much more robust than the new one-- i just keep copies of the old on our lab computers- not the new program
Tim Bressmann
01:11:12
SIL SpeechAnalyzer is free and fairly straightforward to use. If one looks for an alternative to Praat.
paul evitts
01:11:40
SIL speech analyzer for CPP?
James
01:11:45
Does anyone know of ways to measure CPP on PRAAT?
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:11:53
yes I know
Amy Neel
01:12:08
This seminar is being recorded and we will find a way to get it out to everyone who needs it.
Kerry Mandulak
01:12:09
I always do demonstrations within class - and then make a screencast video of how to replicate at home so students have support there too (in both my on-campus and asynchronous speech science class)
paul evitts
01:12:12
James- there's a published script out there- but very difficult to complete in my opinion
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:12:12
I am happy to share it
Jess Kisenwether
01:12:24
There is a way to measure CPP on Praat - I have some instructions I haven’t personally carried through yet
paul evitts
01:12:25
Hedieh- please do!
James
01:12:54
Thanks Paul. Yes I’m aware of that script, but think it is too challenging for teaching students unfortunately. Thanks!
paul evitts
01:12:54
ADSV is clearly the easiest but not everyone has a CSL laying around
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:13:10
Dr. Julie Berkmier webinar on acoustic measures of voice gives an easy way to do it
paul evitts
01:13:26
james- yes! agree.
Carol Tessel
01:13:28
I would also mention that there is a great (and cheap) instruction manual for praat. It has two units that can be purchased on amazon and read on kindle or any other reader app. It also has exercises for the students with the answers provided. Jenna Luque is one of the authors and I use it in my speech science class. Here is the link:
Carol Tessel
01:13:29
https://www.amazon.com/Unit-Visualizing-Hands-Phonetics-Workbook-ebook/dp/B00DZTBSJK/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=jenna+luque&qid=1588804895&sr=8-1
Ferenc Bunta
01:13:38
WASP also has a suite of programs associated with it, like Cochlear Simulation, pitch, and so on
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:13:48
Paul I can send you parts of her presentation about how to get it, send your email to me
Jim
01:13:53
Voice Sauce uses PRAAT to measure CPP
paul evitts
01:15:48
thanks for the praat resource link-- but its kindle. is it available elsewhere?
Jenna Luque
01:16:04
In terms of Praat, and the book that I wrote those 2 units of, referenced above. I am working on a third unit, fyi.
paul evitts
01:16:07
Hedieh-- thanks much! address is pevitts@towson.edu
Jenna Luque
01:16:33
No, right now it is only available on Kindle. I am hoping to get it published, but it is isn't something I have done yet.
Jenna Luque
01:16:48
If you want to see the units that exist, you can email me, handsonphonetics@gmail.com.
Jenna Luque
01:16:57
Or SLPJenna@gmail.com
Jim
01:17:00
Visible body has a lot of modules that are connected to various textbooks.
Ashwini Joshi
01:18:05
https://www1.columbia.edu/sec/itc/hs/medical/anatomy_resources/anatomy/larynx/
Jess Kisenwether
01:18:22
Human Anatomy Atlas is also a nice app… I think it’s about $25. I purchased it myself and just used it in class to show students different views/orientations
Kimberly Meigh
01:18:49
I like anatomy.tv
Skye
01:19:23
On Youtube, Dr. John Campbell has some lovely videos (esp. resp system series)!
Skye
01:19:37
Anatomy.tv from Primal Pictures is wonderful.
Kellyn Hall
01:19:55
http://anatomyzone.com/
paul evitts
01:20:02
blue tree publishing has very good animated videos--
Juliet Weinhold
01:20:41
VT demo is another product out of Mark Huckvale's lab at UCL. This is a great visual for oral tract constriction and synthesis of associated vocal output.
Jennifer Kleinow
01:21:15
Merlot--curated academic resources across many topics
paul evitts
01:21:21
SIG people- can you please send out a transcript from all the chats so we can access all the sites referenced?
Lisa Rai Mabry-Price
01:22:27
Yes, a transcript will be available after the chat.
paul evitts
01:22:47
lisa- thanks!
Mary Huston
01:23:06
Yes please! I'm desperate for lab modules.
Helga McCullough
01:23:11
Thanks so much, Lisa. This is so helpful!
Skye
01:23:21
I know the Haskins Lab website has some demos…it just didn’t work for me the last time I tried to share it with my class.
Lisa Rai Mabry-Price
01:24:05
atneel@unm.edu - Amy Neel
rreeter
01:25:05
if you are using the Behrman text, the plural instructor companion website has prefab labs using PRAAT software following the chapters in the book
Amy Tepper
01:25:07
I had my kids use materials around the house and adapted labs so they could be home-friendly.
James
01:25:33
I have a lot of videos (e.g., stroboscope interpretation) embedded into my PowerPoint presentations and plan to be presenting via Zoom. However, the videos tend not to play smoothly when played (via Zoom). Does anyone have suggestions to resolve this?
Ferenc Bunta
01:27:20
Another option is for students to "rent" materials. Without singling out a particular product, buying it costs about $150 and renting the same thing is about $30.
Amy Neel
01:27:42
PHeT simulations
Donna Edwards
01:28:57
There are some free aps that measure dB that students can use to measure dB in various sites/areas and compare to impact on hearing levels. They can then submit reflections with assigned prompts.
Amy Meredith
01:29:34
I have my students make many things in anatomy and play dough is on their list of class materials. It is cheaper than a latte, so I figure they can afford it.
Sarah Ferguson
01:29:45
we need that TikTok link!
Amanda Warren
01:30:15
It’s when you click share screen
paul evitts
01:30:34
i use pipe cleaners for muscles and arterial supply -- but now theyre called fuzzy sticks.
Richard Lewis
01:30:42
I always used (until this past semester) dry spirometers for an in-class lab wherein the students measured various respiratory volumes and capacities. Any ideas on how to do something similar online, short of having them buy their own instruments online?
paul evitts
01:32:12
university bookstores typically have an extra charge and are more expensive than just out on the open market.
Kellyn Hall
01:32:23
What textbook is everyone using to teach Speech Science?
Jenna Luque
01:32:31
But financial aid might not cover non-bookstore books
Jenna Luque
01:32:41
I used the Carole T. Ferrand text
Jess Kisenwether
01:32:47
Charles Speaks - Introduction to Sound and Kent and Read Acoustic Analysis of Speech
Kerry Mandulak
01:33:00
I use Raphael Borden. & Harris
Amy Tepper
01:33:14
Carole Ferrand text for S/H Science
Carol Tessel
01:33:26
Here are a couple more good websites with waves/acoustics websites with activities that use for assignments
Carol Tessel
01:33:27
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/wavrel.html#c2http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Sound/souspe.html#c1
Rosalie Perkins
01:33:29
We use Ferrand (2018)
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:33:44
what kind of assignments you guys suggest for a neuroanatomy class online? Also as we can not have access to brain labs, how you would design the open access resources in a way to be assessed or graded
Ashwini Joshi
01:33:48
Speech Science by Ferrand
Rosalie Perkins
01:34:06
I would love to just share all my labs!
paul evitts
01:34:23
can the SIG manage the storage?
Sarah Ferguson
01:34:46
There might also be COVID-related funding for setting up something like this
Andrea Novak
01:34:51
Can you create a google doc file?
Mary Huston
01:34:53
We WANT your labs Rosalie!
Amy Meredith
01:34:57
I have a lot of labs students can do at home. I would be happy to share, so just let me know where to send it to.
Helga McCullough
01:35:05
Yes we do, Rosalie!!
paul evitts
01:35:19
ASHA has deep pockets- could subsidize
Margaret Blake
01:37:01
Play doh models of basal ganglia, blood supply to get the 3D aspect; models with play-doh & yarn for the motor & sensory pathways. I usually do these in class w/ no grading, but will be figuring out how to for the fall.
Kellyn Hall
01:38:11
I don't know how to do this online but one in class activity for teaching cortical structures was having them draw the major landmarks of the cortex onto swim caps.
paul evitts
01:39:37
going back to the speech science stuff- i have students use a hand blower found in restrooms and have htem position their hands so that the air creates sound--- then have to explain Bernoulli and how it all happens
paul evitts
01:39:50
needs to be one of those really loud and fast ones though
Nancy Aarts
01:42:20
The literature on adult online learning says 6 min videos max
Amy Meredith
01:42:20
I For anatomy, I wrote this article a while ago. Here's the link to the abstract. https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ase.173
Kathy Nagle
01:42:35
My students seem to prefer 10 minute videos tops, even though they could just pause me.
Amy Meredith
01:42:35
If you want the full article you can email me: mereditha@wsu.edu
Kerry Mandulak
01:42:37
Ive heard that 10 -15 minutes is the best for chunking (from our online education expert at our university)
Jenna Luque
01:42:51
If you are not familiar with Quality Matters, it is a great way to design a class online. It really helps in general too, but it addresses setting up the online class.
Juliet Weinhold
01:42:56
Our online people suggest 5-7 minutes.
Kerry Mandulak
01:43:19
Ours actually said just 10, but 5 - 7 is probably best
Amy Tepper
01:43:25
Remote learning is more consistent with a flipped classroom model.
Kerry Mandulak
01:43:44
I sometimes stretch to 15 but I’m also super wordy
Amy Tepper
01:44:14
We are our own worst critics!!
Martha Dunkelberger
01:44:19
The students always told me they got a kick out my goofs in the videos — I make goofs in class, they thought it was fun to hear me goof.
Sarah Ferguson
01:44:20
YES - first draft!
Helga McCullough
01:44:41
Amy, I love that article! It was so helpful. Thank you.
Kerry Mandulak
01:44:43
Goofs in videos show your humanity :)
Kathy Nagle
01:45:28
They very much like appearances by cats...
Dana R Collins
01:45:47
and greyhounds
paul evitts
01:46:01
i just made a video today with goats and chickens
Elaine Shuey
01:46:02
and a very angry parrot
Juliet Weinhold
01:46:09
Our college has coined the term "Zoom fatigue"!
Amy Meredith
01:46:15
Saying shimmer and jitter too quickly tends to go wrong and they love that.
Jenna Luque
01:46:25
Yes, Amy
Molly Schenker
01:46:59
I always say them very slowly and explain to students why..
David Krupke
01:47:05
This has been wonderful - not a member of SIG 19 but have really enjoyed this and all the sharing - I teach voice/resonance to graduate students - have so many ideas to prepare my Summer distance learning course!!
Nancy Aarts
01:47:19
You can also mitigate by how you organise your week or module in your learning management system.
David Krupke
01:47:34
Amy - I have done that more than once!
Carly Jo Hosbach-Cannon
01:47:36
I'm curious to know if anyone had to cut content with regards to their Speech Science course after moving to remote instruction.
Kerry Mandulak
01:48:15
I did not have to cut content - but I organized it a lot more strictly / concretely
Martha Dunkelberger
01:48:20
YES!!!!
Tim Bressmann
01:48:35
Thank you so much for all the neat ideas and suggestions! Have a good evening everybody, and good night Zoom.
rreeter
01:49:11
thank you for hosting this! I thought it was very helpful and would definitely attend another session if you repeat this someday
Robert Mayo
01:49:18
Thank you. This has been great!
ksiren
01:49:18
Thank you so much to everyone for all this information.
Jeremy Hathway
01:49:19
Thank you all. This has been great.
Kerry Mandulak
01:49:24
This was wonderful - thank you everyone - and I would definitely attend another one for sure!
Amy Tepper
01:49:26
Thank you to everyone for putting this together!!
Kerry Mandulak
01:49:27
Proud member of SIG 19
Cathy Torrington Eaton
01:49:29
Yes, thank you!
Helga McCullough
01:49:35
This truly has been great! Much appreciated!
Amy Meredith
01:49:35
Thank you!
Hedieh Hashemi Hosseinabad
01:49:36
Thanks everyone for sharing your experiences
Molly Schenker
01:49:37
This was great. Thank you!!!
Amy Larocca
01:49:38
This has been great! Thank you for sharing your ideas!!!
paul evitts
01:49:41
yes, thanks for organizing.
Kellyn Hall
01:49:46
Thank you!
Donna Edwards
01:49:46
Thank you for the meeting and the resources~
Kathy Nagle
01:49:48
this has been great - thanks, panel!
Kimberly Meigh
01:49:48
Wonderful information - thank you!!
Sarah Ferguson
01:49:50
thank you!!!
Jordan Differdng
01:49:51
Thank you!
Jim
01:49:51
Thanks to everyone. This has been great. A lot to process but great stuff.
Jenna Luque
01:49:52
Thanks everybody!
Dana R Collins
01:49:53
Thank you so much for doing this. Can’t wait for the info.
Cynthia Green
01:49:56
Thank you to all!
paul evitts
01:49:57
and thanks for emailing all of us the chat info--
Juliet Weinhold
01:49:58
thank you all!
Robert Serianni
01:49:59
Thanks - this was great!
Ferenc Bunta
01:49:59
Thank you
Martha Dunkelberger
01:50:03
Thank you!
Rupert Johnson
01:50:17
Thank You!
Ashwini Joshi
01:50:19
Thank you!
kimharrell
01:50:20
Thank you!
Andrea Novak
01:50:28
Thanks... very informative!
Richard Lewis
01:51:05
I hope whatever compilation is done is made available to those of us who are not SIG-19 members.